Book review: Puritan Girl, Mohawk Girl: A Novel by John Demos

  • Puritan Girl, Mohawak Girl by John Demos
  • Publisher:  Amulet Books
  • Date published:  (October 31, 2017)
  • Pages:  160 pages
  • Genre:  8-12 years (middle grade)

DESCRIPTION:

Inspired by Demos’s award-winning novel The Unredeemed CaptivePuritan Girl, Mohawk Girl will captivate a young audience, providing a Native American perspective rather than the Western one typically taught in the classroom.

As the armed conflicts between the English colonies in North America and the French settlements raged in the 1700s, a young Puritan girl, Eunice Williams, is kidnapped by Mohawk people and taken to Canada. She is adopted into a new family, a new culture, and a new set of traditions that will define her life. As Eunice spends her days learning the Mohawk language and the roles of women and girls in the community, she gains a deeper understanding of her Mohawk family.  Although her father and brother try to persuade Eunice to return to Massachusetts, she ultimately chooses to remain with her Mohawk family and settlement.

Puritan Girl, Mohawk Girl offers a compelling and rich lesson that is sure to enchant young readers and those who want to deepen their understanding of Native American history.

BUY THE BOOK:   AMAZON    BARNES & NOBLE  

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

John Putnam Demos is an American author and historian. He has written two books which discuss witch-hunts and has discovered that one of his own ancestors was John Putnam Senior, ancestor of the Putnam family which was prominent in the Salem witch trials.

Demos was awarded the prestigious Bancroft Prize for his book Entertaining Satan. He was awarded the 1995 Francis Parkman Prize for his book The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story From Early America.

He retired in December 2008 as the Samuel Knight Professor of History at Yale University.

Demos lives in Tyringham, Massachusetts and is currently working on a new book.

CONNECT WITH THE AUTHOR:    WEBSITE

REVIEW:  

This book caught my attention because I have very good friends who belong to the Mohawk nation in Kahnawake, close to the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. One of my friends, although Mohawk, is tall and white skinned and I am told it was because there was a white captive that was adopted into his tribe several generations ago.

Puritan Girl, Mohawk Girl is an excellent way to teach history to middle grade children through storytelling. Although the main character, Eunice Williams really existed, most of the details are fictional but based on the daily life of the Mohawk people.

I remember reading a very similar story as a young girl entitled “Calico Captive”. The story was similar but with a much different ending. I really enjoyed Eunice’s story and found it to be quite a page turner.