Book review: Kitty Hawk and the Tragedy of the RMS Titanic by Iain Reading

  • Title and author:  Kitty Hawk and the Tragedy of the RMS Titanic by Iain Reading
  • Publisher:  CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Date published:  February 16, 2014
  • Pages:  234
  • Genre:  Mystery / thriller / women sleuths / YA fiction

Book Description:

Kitty Hawk and the Tragedy of the RMS Titanic is the thrillingly cryptic fourth installment of the exciting Kitty Hawk Flying Detective Agency Series featuring the intrepid teenage seaplane pilot Kitty Hawk and her various adventures of mystery and intrigue as she follows in the footsteps of Amelia Earhart on an epic flight around the world. This fourth book in the series brings Kitty to the emerald hills of Ireland where she meets a handsome stranger and is quickly swept up in a perplexing hundred-year-old family treasure hunt involving secret codes and puzzling clues that lead her on a fast-paced adventure that carries her from Dublin to London – from the decks of the ill-fated ocean liner Titanic to the temples of ancient Egypt and the streets of Jack the Ripper – until she finally unlocks the mystery and discovers the long-hidden treasure.

Much like the earlier books in this series, Kitty Hawk and the Tragedy of the RMS Titanic is a perfect book to fire the imaginations of armchair detectives of all ages. Filled with fascinating and highly Google-able locations and history the reader will find themselves immersed in brand new worlds that are brought to life before their very eyes as Kitty Hawk experiences the stories and history of a doomed ocean liner and unravels the Tragedy of the RMS Titanic.

Buy the book:    Amazon    Barnes & Noble

About the Author:   I Like Root Beer. When I was younger I fancied myself a bit of a Root Beer connoisseur, drinking my favourite brand (A&W, of course) from tall, narrow champagne flûtes and revelled in the sound of the ice cubes clinking against the side of the thin glass, creating a magical tinkling ambiance as I looked down my nose at all the other inferior Root Beer vintages. As I grew older and began to travel all across the globe I was naturally inclined to seek out the very best Root Beers that the world had to offer. Sadly, as I was to discover, Root Beer is very much a North-American thing and you can’t really find it anywhere else in the world. On the bright side, however, it turns out that the world is a pretty great place even without Root Beer. There are a million amazing things to see and as many more ways for all of us to see them, as our heroine and friend Kitty Hawk finds out in the course of her various adventures.

Connect with the author:   Website    Facebook    Twitter    Kitty Hawk Website

REVIEW:

Having followed Kitty Hawk from Alaska, Florida and Iceland we are now ready for a new adventure in the British Isles.  Kitty arrives in Ireland where she is doing a promotion for Wasabi Willy’s, a chain of restaurants that are promoting Kitty’s around-the-world tour.  At the sushi restaurant, she makes eye contact with a (ahem) handsome fellow in the audience.   Having read about her exploits in Florida and Iceland, Andrew, a young, good looking Scot, has a mystery that he wants Kitty to help him solve.

The mystery has to do with the sinking of RMS Titanic. Andrew’s great uncle was First Officer, William McMaster Murdoch, whose role in the marine disaster was often called into question.  Andrew shows Kitty documents his family received from an anonymous source in 1937 that were written in code.  Unable to decipher the code, he asks Kitty as the “One Woman Flying Detective Agency” to help solve the mystery.

Again, I have to admit that I learned so much about British and Irish history, hieroglyphics, code breaking, Sherlock Holmes and Egyptology.  Kitty and Andrew’s investigation leads them to a dangerous nemesis and the plot heats up as they struggle to stay one step ahead.  Heart-pounding adventure for these two is never far behind.

Although a popular theme found in London’s walking tours , I found that the sections about Jack the Ripper to be a bit too graphic for young adult readers.  I had to skim through these parts – they were pretty gross (imho).  I also question Kitty’s ethics in this story. What I really liked about Kitty is her ability to discern between right and wrong.

Kitty’s fourth adventure has everything we would expect – a bit of romance, oodles of excitement, as well as interesting bits of literature and history thrown in.  I can’t wait to read the next adventure in book number five!